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Real World builds in .NET

How do you build your Visual Studio solution, verify your coding guidelines and execute tests?
What steps do you take when adding a new project to your Visual Studio solution?

Living in the past

Let me summarize my past experience. I have tried several different approaches, all of them involved build scripts, and Visual Studio Project Templates or manual editing of *.csproj files. I don’t like any of the approaches. Why? I will show you some drawbacks of this kind of build definitions.

Build scripts:

  • you have to learn a scripting language
  • you try to solve problems which you would solve in your preferred .NET language with less effort

Visual Studio Project Templates:

  • making up-to-date versions available to all team members is a PITA (pain in the ass butt)
  • update your templates and you still have to update all previously existing *.csproj files manually
  • if you change your build process (e.g. enable StyleCop) you have to release and distribute a new version of your templates

Manual editing:

  • enough said

Imagine the unimaginable

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Administration of MSMQ

If you are doing integration over Microsoft Message Queuing (MSMQ) all the provided links in this blogpost could be very useful. Administration of Microsoft Message Queuing (MSMQ) can be hard without the right information at your fingertips. Here you find everything necessary to setup and operate MSMQ successfully. Most of these links are very old and some of the administration information is a bit outdated on latest Windows Servers. Nonetheless are this blog post very helpful to understand the inner workings of MSMQ in order to properly configure it for production. I will add more links from time to time to this blogpost. Continue reading

PowerShell V2 installed by default

I’m quite sure you know Powershell – this incredibly fancy Shell that allows you to do things you couldn’t even imagine without 🙂

Version 1.1 of Powershell is now heavy on market – every new software from Microsoft must be powershell-enabled.

But the best thing is that Microsoft announced, Powershell will be installed by default on every copy of Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows 7. And as far as I know there will be support for Powershell in Windows Server Core.

Find the details here