CategoryArchitecture

Composite UI for Service Oriented Systems – Composition Patterns

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This blogpost is part of a larger blog post series. Get the overview of the content here.

 
The Composite Front End pattern glues “things” together as a cohesive whole still keeping them autonomous. The Composite Front End patterns takes the ideas of web portals and applies them to SOA. It is composed of two main components: the portlet and the host.

Composite UI for Service Oriented Systems – Mashup means bringing it together

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This blogpost is part of a larger blog post series. Get the overview of the content here. A frontend is not owned by a single “thing”. It is a mashup of multiple “things” combined together to provide a single user experience. Looking at it from the deployment perspective we can say that many “things” can be deployed to the same box, many “things” can be deployed in the same app, many “things” can cooperate in a workflow and many “things” can be mashed up in the same page. Which brings us...

Composite UI for Service Oriented Systems – Services are not webservices

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This blogpost is part of a larger blog post series. Get the overview of the content here. But messaging alone is not enough! We need to decompose our system. Service Orientation can help us with that. Service Orientation or Service Oriented Architecture was first used in 1996 when Roy Schulte and Yeffim V. Natiz from Gartner defined it as “a style of multitier computing that helps organizations share logic and data among multiple applications and usage modes”. Unfortunately the term SOA has...

Composite UI for Service Oriented Systems – More message patterns

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This blogpost is part of a larger blog post series. Get the overview of the content here. I briefly mentioned that the message has a body. The body carries on the payload or the actual business data identified by the message. Furthermore a message can contain metadata on its header. This allows the message to carry on additional information which can be consumed by the receiver side. Message forwarders need to make sure that the headers remain intact during the communication process. This means...

Composite UI for Service Oriented Systems – Messaging and fault tolerance

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  This blogpost is part of a larger blog post series. Get the overview of the content here. Consider a classical application approach where clients invoke remote procedure calls on the server. Now, what happens to the initiating request when a crash occurs? For example when the IIS App pool recycles or a connection has been refused by the remote host when too many transactions are waiting to time out. The initiating request is lost or if you are lucky somewhere present as cryptic...

Composite UI for Service Oriented Systems – Messaging vs. RPC

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This blogpost is part of a larger blog post series. Get the overview of the content here. In the beginning, RPC style communication seems to be better performing than messaging. But when the load on the systems increases and no more threads are available the RPC performance decreases. One cause of the RPC performance decrease is the need to acquire threads from the thread pool and to allocate memory for the parameters of each request. A messaging infrastructure can deterministically assign a...

Composite UI for Service Oriented Systems – Messaging Introduction

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This blogpost is part of a larger blog post series. Get the overview of the content here. Messaging can help to reduce coupling in your system. It also addresses some of the fallacies of distributed computing. But messaging is no silver bullet. You have to carefully choose according to your non-functional requirements, risk analysis, fallacies and more whether it makes sense to use messaging. Messaging can take place inside the same process boundaries (i.e. with Event Aggregators) or over...

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